東大過去問 2020年 第5問(総合)

/ 3月 19, 2020/ 東大過去問, 第5問(総合), 過去問/ 2 comments

・2020年の全問題はこちらからどうぞ

【問題文】

以下の英文を読み、(A)~(D)の問いに答えよ。

“Let’s make a bet,” my father said, on my fifteenth birthday. I remember very clearly being fifteen; or rather, I remember what fifteen feels like to a fifteen-year-old. The age is a diving board, a box half-opened.
We were sitting in stiff wooden chairs on the lawn, watching the evening settle over the neighborhood, all of that harmless fading light softening the world.
“I bet you’ll leave here at eighteen and you’ll never come back,” he said. “Not once.”
We lived two hours outside of Los Angeles, in a suburb attached to a string of other suburbs, where (A)the days rarely distinguished themselves unless you did it for them.
“You don’t even think I’ll come back and visit?” I said.
“No,” he said. “I don’t.” My father was a reasonable man. He did not generalize. He was not prone to big, dubious statements, and he rarely gambled. I felt hurt and excited by the suggestion.
“What about Mom?” I asked.
“What about her?”
I shrugged. It seemed she had little to do with his prediction.
“And James?” I asked.
“Not sure about James,” he said. “I can’t bet on that one.”
James was — and still is — my younger brother. I felt little responsibility for him. At ten, he was (ア26) but anxious and very much my parents’ problem. My mother adored him, though she thought ( B ). Make no mistake: we were equally loved but not equally preferred. If parents don’t have favorites, they do have allies.
Inside, my mother was cooking dinner while James followed her around the kitchen, handing her bits of paper he’d folded into unusual shapes. Even then, he had a talent for geometry.
“Where will I go?” I asked my father. My grades were merely (ア27). I’d planned — vaguely, at fifteen — to transfer somewhere after a few years at the local junior college.
“It doesn’t matter where,” he said, waving away a fly circling his nose.
Next door, the quiet neighbor kid, Carl, walked his dog, also called Carl, back and forth across his lawn. The weather was pleasant.
“What happens if I do come back?” I asked.
“You’ll lose if you come back,” he said.
I hated to lose, and my father knew it.
“Will I see you again?” I asked. I felt ( イ )in a way that felt new, at fifteen, as though the day had turned shadowy and distant, already a memory. I felt ( イ ) about my father and his partly bald head and his toothpaste breath, even as he sat next to me, running his palms over his hairy knees.
“Of course,” he said. “Your mother and I will visit.”
My mother appeared at the front door with my brother, his fingers holding the back pocket of her jeans. “Dinnertime,” she said, and I kissed my father’s cheek as though I were standing on a train platform. I spent all of dinner feeling that way too, staring at him from across the table, mouthing goodbye.
My eighteenth birthday arrived the summer after I’d graduated from high school. To celebrate, I saw the musical Wicked  at a theater in Los Angeles with four of my friends. The seats were deep and velvety. My parents drove us, and my father gave us each a glass of champagne in the parking lot before we entered the theater. We used small plastic cups he must have bought especially for the occasion. I pictured him walking around the supermarket, looking at all the cups, deciding.
A week after my birthday, my father woke me up, quieter than usual. He seemed (ア28). I still had my graduation cap tacked up on the wall. My mother had taken the dress I’d worn that day to the dry cleaner, and it still lay on the floor in its cover.
“Are you ready to go?” he asked.
“Where are you taking me?” I wanted to know.
“To the train station,” he said slowly. “It’s time for you to go.”
My father had always liked the idea of traveling. Even just walking through an airport gave him a thrill — it made him (ア29), seeing all those people hurrying through the world on their way to somewhere else. He had a deep interest in history and the architecture of places he’d never seen in person. It was the great tragedy of his life that he could never manage to travel. As for my mother, it was the great tragedy of her life that her husband was (ア30) and didn’t take any pains to hide it. I can see that now, even if I didn’t see it then.
“Where’s Mom?” I asked. “And where’s James?”
“The supermarket,” my father said. James loved the supermarket — the order of things, all (ア31) in their rows. “Don’t cry,” Dad said then, smoothing my pillowcase, still warm with sleep. He had a pained look on his face.
“Don’t cry,” he said again. I hadn’t noticed it had started. (C)My whole body felt emotional in those days, like I was an egg balanced on a spoon.
“You’ll be good,” he said. “You’ll do good.”
“But what about junior college?” I asked. “What about plans?” I’d already received a stack of shiny school pamphlets in the mail. True, I didn’t know what to do with them yet, but I had them just the same.
“No time,” my father said, and the urgency in his voice made me hurry.

 

【問題】

(A) 下線部(A)の内容を本文に即して日本語で説明せよ。

(B) 下に与えられた語を正しい順に並び替え、空所( B )を埋めるのに最も適切な表現を完成させよ。

equal, fooled, into, me, she, thinking, we, were

(C) 下線部(C)の内容をこの場面に即して具体的に日本語で説明せよ。

(D) 以下の問いに答えよ。

(ア)空所(26)~(31)には単語が一つずつ入る。それぞれに文脈上最も適切な語を次のうちから一つずつ選べ。ただし、同じ記号を複数回用いてはならない。

a) average
b) cheerful
c) frightened
d) intelligent
e) neat
f) solemn
g) tolerant
h) unhappy

(イ)空所(イ)に入れるのに最も適切な単語を次のうちから一つ選べ。

a) angry
b) delighted
c) excited
d) sentimental
e) unfair

(ウ)本文の内容と合致するものはどれか。一つ選べ。

a) The author finally decided to go to the local junior college.
b) The author had planned to leave home since she was fifteen.
c) The author had to leave home because there was conflict between her parents.
d) The author’s father drove her away because he hated her.
e) The author’s father predicted that she would not come back home although he and her mother would visit her.

 

【単語】

 

【和訳】

「賭けをしよう」私の15歳の誕生日に父が言った。私は『15歳である』ということ、つまり『15歳の人間が15歳であることについてどう感じるか』ということを、極めて明確に覚えている。その年齢は飛び込み板であり、半開きの箱なのだ。
私達は芝生の上の硬い木の椅子に座って、夕闇が辺りに落ちていくのを見ていた。その無邪気な衰えゆく光は、世界を穏やかに和らげていた。
「俺は賭けるよ。お前は18歳で出て行って、もう戻らない」彼は言った。「二度とね」
私達はロサンゼルスから2時間の、多数の郊外に接している、ある郊外の町に住んでいた。そこでは意識的にそうしない限り、ある日々を別の日々と区別することがほとんど出来なかった。
「一時的帰省することもないって思うの?」と私は訊ねた。
「ないな」と父は言った。「ないと思う」彼は論理的な人だった。彼は一般論を言う人ではなかった。大袈裟な、不明確なことを言わず、愚痴をこぼすこともめったになかった。私は父のその時言ったことに傷付き、動転した。
「お母さんはどうなの?」私は訊ねた。
「母さんが何だっていうんだい?」
私は肩をすくめた。父の予言に母はほとんど関係がないように思えた。
「ジェームズは?」私は訊ねた。
「ジェームズに関してはよく分からない」彼は言った。「それに関しては賭けられない」
ジェームズは私の弟であったし、今でもそうである。私は彼に対して責任をほとんど感じていなかった。彼は知的であったが不安症で、両親にとっての厄介な問題だった。母は、私達が公平だと私を騙せているつもりでいるようだったが、ジェームズの方を溺愛していた。勘違いをしないでほしい。私達は確かに公平に愛されていたのだが、公平に好かれていたわけではなかった。両親に贔屓はないかもしれないが、同盟関係は存在するのだ。
家の中では、母が夕飯の準備をし、ジェームズは彼女の周りを付いて回って、奇妙な形に折った紙切れを渡そうとしていた。当時から彼は幾何の才能があったのだ。
「私はどこへ行くの?」私は父に訊ねた。私の成績は月並みなものでしかなかった。私は地元の短期大学を出たらどこかへ転居するのだと、15歳の時ぼんやりと計画していた。
「どこか、というのは問題じゃない」と、鼻の周りを飛び回るハエを手で追い払いながら、父は言った。
隣に住んでいる、もの静かな子供のカールが、犬を散歩させていた。その犬もカールという名で、自宅の庭の芝生を行ったり来たりしていた。心地良い天候だった。
「私がもしも帰ってきたら?」私は訊ねた。
「もしも帰ってきたら、お前は負けたってことさ」父は言った。
私は負けず嫌いだった。そして父はそのことをよく知っていた。
「もう会えないの?」私は訊ねた。私は感傷的になっていた。それは15歳にして初めて感じるものに思えた。まるでその日がぼんやりと遠くなって、いながらにして思い出になってしまったかのようだった。私は、父が隣に座って、毛深い脛を手のひらで撫でているにもかかわらず、父と、父の半ば禿げた頭と、歯磨き粉の香りのする息について、感傷的になっていた。
「もちろん会えるさ」彼は言った。「母さんと俺が会いに行く」
母がジェームズと一緒に玄関に現れた。彼は母のジーンズのお尻のポケットを握りしめていた。「ご飯よ」と母は言った。そして私は、駅のプラットホームに立っているかのように、父の頬にキスをした。私はディナーの間中、そんな感情のままで過ごした。テーブル越しに父を見つめ、さよならを呟いていた。
私が高校を卒業した夏、18歳の誕生日がやってきた。お祝いのため、ロサンゼルスの劇場に4人の友達とミュージカルのウィキッドを見に行った。座席は深く、滑らかだった。私の両親が送ってくれたのだが、劇場に入る前の駐車場で、父が私達みんなにシャンパンを振る舞ってくれた。私達は、父がこのためにわざわざ買っておいてくれたに違いない、小さなプラスチックのカップを使った。父がスーパーを歩き回り、カップを物色し、決断する姿を、私はありありと思い浮かべた。
私の誕生日から一週間後、父はいつもより静かに、私を起こした。彼は厳粛な様子だった。卒業式の角帽はまだ壁に掛かっていた。母は私の着たガウンをその日にクリーニングに出したので、カバーが掛かったまま、まだ床に置かれていた。
「出発の準備はいいか?」父は言った。
「私をどこに連れて行くの?」私は知りたかった。
「駅だ」彼はゆっくりと言った。「出発する時間なんだ」
父はいつも旅行というものを好んでいた。空港を歩いて通り抜けるだけで、彼の心は踊った。それだけで彼は陽気になり、人々が世界を股にかけ何処かに向かって急ぐ様を眺めた。彼は歴史と、実際に見たことのない場所の建築物に強い関心を持っていた。旅行する余裕など一度もなかったことは、彼の人生にとって大きな悲劇だった。母にとっては、夫が不幸であり、それをまるで隠そうとしなかったことが大きな悲劇だった。私は今になってそれが分かる。当時はそれが見えていなかった。
「お母さんはどこ?」私は訊ねた。「あとジェームズは?」
「スーパーさ」父は言った。ジェームズはスーパー、つまり列にきっちりと並べられたモノの配列が好きだった。「泣くんじゃない」その時、父は私の眠りでまだ温かい枕カバーを直しながら言った。彼の表情には苦痛が表れていた。
「泣くんじゃない」彼はもう一度言った。私は涙が溢れていることに気付いていなかった。その頃は、私の身体全てが感情的だった。まるでスプーンの上で揺れている卵のように。
「お前は上手くいく」彼は言った。「上手くやっていくさ」
「だけど短大は?」私は訊ねた。「計画は?」私は既にピカピカの入学案内を大量に郵便で受け取っていた。実際、それをどうすれば良いのか分からなかったけれど、でもそれを持っていたのだ。
「時間がない」父が言った。その切迫した声を聞き、私は急がねばならないのだと悟った。

 

【解答】

(A) ありきたりの郊外の町で過ごした日々は、毎日が代わり映えのしないものであったということ。

(B) she fooled me into thinking we were equal

(C) 父との別れに際し、涙が溢れていることに自分でも気が付かなかったほど、当時の筆者は感情をコントロールできなかったということ。

(D) (ア) 26-d、27-a、28-f、29-b、30-h、31-e

(イ) d

(ウ) e

(Visited 1,458 times, 3 visits today)
Share this Post

2 Comments

  1. (ウ)の選択肢から、主人公は女性と推測できるので、訳中の「僕」は「私」にした方が良いのでは。

    1. その通りですね。和訳と解答の作業を別にやっていたので、気が付きませんでした。ありがとうございます!訂正しておきました。

Leave a Comment

メールアドレスが公開されることはありません。 * が付いている欄は必須項目です

*
*

日本語が含まれない投稿は無視されますのでご注意ください。(スパム対策)