東大過去問 2016年 第5問(総合)

/ 4月 13, 2020/ 東大過去問, 第5問(総合), 過去問/ 0 comments

・2016年の全問題はこちらからどうぞ

【問題文】

次の文章を読み、(A)〜(D)の問いに答えよ。

Last year, there was great public protest against the use of “anti-homeless” spikes outside a London residential complex, not far from where I live. The spikes were sharp pieces of metal stuck in concrete to keep people from sitting or lying on the ground. Social media were filled with anger, a petition was signed, a sleep-in protest undertaken, and within a few days the spikes were removed. But the phenomenon of “defensive” or “hostile” architecture, as it is known, remains common.
From bus-shelter seats that lean forward, to water sprinklers, hard tube-like rests, and park benches with solid dividers, urban spaces are aggressively ( 26 ) soft, human bodies.
We see these measures all the time within our urban environments, whether in London or Tokyo, but we fail to grasp (A)their true intent. I hardly noticed them before I became homeless in 2009. An economic crisis, a death in the family, a sudden divorce and an even more sudden mental breakdown were all it took for me to go from a more than decent income to being homeless in the space of a year. It was only then, when I started looking around my surroundings with the distinct purpose of ( 27 ) shelter, that the city’s cruelty became clear.
I learned to love London Underground’s Circle Line back then. To others it was just a rather inefficient line on the subway network. To me ― and many homeless people ― it was a safe, dry warm container, continually travelling sometimes above the surface, sometimes below, like a giant needle stitching London’s center into place. Nobody bothered you or made you move. You were allowed to take your poverty on tour. But engineering work put a stop to that.
Next was a bench in a smallish park just off a main road. It was an old, wooden bench, made smooth by thousands of sitters, underneath a tree with leaves so thick that only the most persistent rain could penetrate it. Sheltered and warm, this was prime property. Then, one morning, it was gone. In its place stood an uncomfortable metal perch, with three solid armrests. I felt such loss that day. The message was clear: I was not a member of the public, at least not of the public that is welcome here. I had to find somewhere else to go.
There is a wider problem, too. These measures do not and cannot distinguish the homeless from others considered more ( 28 ). When we make it impossible for the poor to rest their weary bodies at a bus shelter, we also make it impossible for the elderly, for the handicapped, for the pregnant woman who needs rest. By making the city less ( 29 ) of the human body, we make it less welcoming to all humans.
Hostile architecture is ( 30 ) on a number of levels, because it is not the product of accident or thoughtlessness, but a thought process. It is a sort of unkindness that is considered, designed, approved, funded and made real with the explicit motive to threaten and exclude.
Recently, as I walked into my local bakery, a homeless man (whom I had seen a few times before) asked whether I could get him something to eat. When I asked Ruth ― one of the young women who work behind the counter ― to put a couple of meat pies in a separate bag and (B)explained why, her remark was severe: “He probably makes more money than you from begging, you know,” she said, coldly.
He probably didn’t. Half his face was covered with sores. A blackened, badly injured toe stuck out of a hole in his ancient shoe. His left hand was covered in dry blood from some recent accident or fight. I pointed this out. Ruth was unmoved by my protest. “I don’t care,” she said. “They foul the green area. They’re dangerous. Animals.”
It’s precisely this viewpoint that hostile architecture upholds: that the homeless are a different species altogether, inferior and responsible for their fall. Like pigeons to be chased away, or urban foxes disturbing our sleep with their screams. “You should be ashamed,” jumped in Libby, the older lady who works at the bakery. (C)“That is someone’s son you’re talking about.”
Poverty exists as a parallel, but separate, reality. City planners work very hard to keep it outside our field of vision. It is too miserable, too discouraging, too painful to look at someone sleeping in a doorway and think of him as “someone’s son.” It is easier to see him and only ask the question:(31)“How does his homelessness affect me?” So we cooperate with urban design and work very hard at not seeing, because we do not want to see. We silently agree to this apartheid.
Defensive architecture keeps poverty unseen. It conceals any guilt about leading a comfortable life. It brutally reveals our attitude to poverty in general and homelessness in particular. It is the concrete, spiked expression of a collective lack of generosity of spirit.
And, of course, it doesn’t even achieve its basic goal of making us feel safer. (32)There is no way of locking others out that doesn’t also lock us in.Making our urban environment hostile breeds hardness and isolation. It makes life a little uglier for all of us.
 

【問題】

(A)下線部(A)は具体的にどのような内容を表すか、日本語で述べよ。

(B)下線部(B)で、語り手は具体的に何が何のためであったと説明したか、日本語で述べよ

(C)下線部(C)で言われていることを次のように言い換える場合、空所に入る最も適切な一語を本文中からそのまま形を変えずに選んで書きなさい。なお、空所(26)〜(30)の選択肢を書いてはならない。

The man you’re talking about is no less ( ) than you are.

(D)以下の問いに答え、解答の記号をマークシートにマークせよ。

(ア)空所(26)〜(30)には単語が一つずつ入る。それぞれに文脈上最も適切な語を次のうちから一つずつ選び、マークシートの(26)〜(30)にその記号をマークせよ。同じ記号を複数回用いてはならない。

(a) accepting
(b) depriving
(c) deserving
(d) finding
(e) forcing
(f) implying
(g) raising
(h) rejecting
(i) revealing
(j) satisfying

(イ)下線部(31)はどのような考えを表しているか、最も適切なものを一つ選び、マークシートの(31)にその記号をマークせよ。

(a) Seeing this homeless person upsets me.
(b) His homelessness has an impact on everyone.
(c) I wonder how I can offer help to this homeless person.
(d) This homeless person has no right to sleep in the doorway.
(e) I wonder whether this homeless person has any relevance to my life at all.

(ウ)下線部(32)はどのような考えを表しているか、最も適切なものを一つ選び、マークシートの(32)にその記号をマークせよ。

(a) Defensive architecture harms us all.
(b) Ignoring homelessness won’t make it go away.
(c) Restrictions on the homeless are for their own good.
(d) Homeless people will always be visible whatever we do.
(e) For security, we have to keep homeless people put of sight.

 

【和訳】

昨年、私の住んでいる場所からそれほど遠くないロンドンのとある集合住宅に「ホームレスよけ」のスパイクが設置された事に対する、大規模な抗議行動が起きた。そのスパイクはコンクリートに埋め込まれた尖った金属パーツであり、人々が地面に座ったり寝たり出来ないようにするためのものであった。ソーシャル・メディアは怒りで溢れかえり、嘆願書に署名が集まり、泊まり込みの抗議が行われ、数日でスパイクは撤去された。しかし「防御のための」建築、あるいは「敵意ある」建築は、ご存知の通り、普及したままである。
前傾タイプのバス停のシートから、スプリンクラー、硬いチューブ状のひじ掛け、硬い仕切りのある公園のベンチまで、都会のスペースは柔らかい人間の身体を頑なに拒絶している。
私達はロンドンであろうが、東京であろうが、都市環境の中でこうした手法を日常的に目にしているが、その本当の意図に気付いていない。私も自分が2009年にホームレスになるまでは、それにほとんど気付かなかった。経済危機、家族の死、突然の離婚、そしてさらに突然だった精神的な破綻、、、それら全てが重なり、私は一年もしないうちに、ある程度以上の収入からホームレスになったのだ。寝場所を見つけるという明確な意図を持って自分の周囲を見回した時に初めて、都市の冷酷さが立ち現れてきたのであった。
私は当時、ロンドン地下鉄環状線が好きになった。他の人にとっては、それは地下鉄ネットワークの中でもかなり非効率な路線に過ぎなかったが。私にとって、そして多くのホームレスにとって、それは安全で暖かく、雨に濡れないコンテナであった。まるで巨人の針のように、時に地上を時に地下を間断なく走り、ロンドンの中心を各地点に縫い付けていたのだ。誰にも邪魔されることはなかったし、出て行けと言われることもなかった。貧しいものでも乗っていることが許されていたのだ。しかし工学的な工夫がなされたことで、それは終わってしまった。
次は大通りからわずかに離れた所にある小振りの公園のベンチだった。それは古い木製のベンチで、数千人もの人が座ったことにより表面が滑らかになっており、葉が分厚く生い繁った木の下にあったので、よほどの長雨でなければ濡れることがなかった。風雨をしのげて暖かい。これは何よりの財産だった。ところがある朝それはなくなっていた。その場所には、3本の硬いアームレストの付いた金属の棒のようなベンチがあった。私はその日喪失感に打ちひしがれた。そのメッセージは明らかだった。私は民衆の一員ではないのだ。少なくともここで歓迎されている民衆の一員ではないのだ。私は他に行く場所を探さなければならなかった。
もっと広範な問題もある。こうしたやり方はホームレスとより助けが必要だと思われる他の人々を区別しないし、できない。ホームレスがその疲れた身体をバス停で休めることを出来ないようにする場合、休息が必要なお年寄りや障害者や妊婦までも、休めなくなってしまう。人間の身体を受け入れないように都市を変造するということは、全ての人間に対してそれを行うということなのだ。
敵意のある建築は多くのレベルにおいて啓発的である。というのも、それが偶然や不注意による産物ではなく、思考の過程そのものだからである。それは脅迫し除外するという明白な動機の下で、考え抜かれ、設計され、承認され、予算が付き、実現された、一種の不親切なのである。
最近、私が地元のパン屋に入った時、以前何度か見たことのある1人のホームレスの男性が、何か食べ物をくれないかと、私に頼んだ。私がカウンターに立って働いていた若い女性の1人であるルースに、ミートパイを2つ、別の袋に入れるよう注文し、その理由を説明した所、彼女の発言は辛辣だった。「彼は物乞いすることであなたより稼いでるかもしれませんよ」彼女は冷たくそう言い放った。
彼が私より稼いでいるなどということはなかっただろう。彼の顔の半分は腫れ物だらけだった。彼の古びた靴の穴からは、黒ずんでひどく傷付いたつま先が飛び出していた。彼の左手には最近の事故だか喧嘩だかによる、乾いた血がこびり付いていた。私はそれを指摘した。ルースは私の反論に動じなかった。「どうでもいいわ。あの人達は緑地を汚しているのよ。危険よ。動物みたいなものよ」
敵意ある建築が擁護しているのは、まさにこういった観点である。つまり、ホームレスは全く別の種であり、劣等種であり、彼らの没落は自業自得だというのである。追放されるべき鳩や、叫び声をあげて人々の眠りを妨げる都会の狐と同等だというのである。「恥を知りなさい」そのパン屋で働いている年配の女性である、リビーが割って入った。「あなたが話しているその人だって、誰かの息子なのよ」
貧困は今そこで起きている現実であるにもかかわらず、分離された現実として存在している。都市計画の設計者は、貧困を視界の外へ追いやろうと躍起になっている。誰かが玄関で寝ているのを見て、それが「誰かの息子」だと考えるのは、あまりに悲惨で、憂鬱で、痛ましすぎるのだ。彼を見て「彼がホームレスであることが、私に何の関係があるんだ?」と問うだけの方が楽である。だから我々は都市計画と協力し、何としても目を逸らそうとする。見たくないからである。我々は暗黙のうちにこのアパルトヘイトに同意しているのだ。
防御のための建築は貧困を覆い隠し、快適な生活を送ることに関する罪悪感を全て包み隠してしまう。防御のための建築は、貧困全般に対する、特にホームレスであることに対する、我々の態度を紛れもなく示している。それは我々の多くに、寛容の精神が欠如していることを、具体的かつ刺々しく表現しているのだ。
そしてもちろん、それは我々を安心させるという一般的な目的ですら達成できていない。というのも、他者を閉め出すことはすなわち、我々自身を閉じ込めることになるからである。都市環境を敵意的にすることは、過酷さと孤立を助長する。それは我々全ての生活を幾分醜悪なものにしているのだ。
 

【解答】

(A) ホームレスの人々が座ったり寝たりできる場所をなくし、都市環境から排除する意図。
(B) ミートパイを2つ、別の袋に入れるように注文したのは、ホームレスの男性にあげるためであるということ。
(C) human
(D) (ア) (26) h
(27) d
(28) c
(29) a
(30) i
(イ) (e)
(ウ) (a)
(Visited 1,031 times, 1 visits today)
Share this Post

Leave a Comment

メールアドレスが公開されることはありません。 * が付いている欄は必須項目です

*
*

日本語が含まれない投稿は無視されますのでご注意ください。(スパム対策)