東大過去問 2005年 第5問(総合)

/ 5月 12, 2020/ 東大過去問, 第5問(総合)/ 0 comments

【問題文】

次の英文は、イギリスのウェールズ地方の灯台を舞台にした物語である。これを読み、以下の問いに答えよ。

The old lighthouse was white and round, with a little door, a circular window at the top, and the huge lamp. The door was usually half open, and one could see a spiral staircase. It was so inviting that one day I couldn’t resist going inside, and, once inside, going up. I was thirteen, a cheerful, black-haired boy; I could enter places then that I can’t enter now, slip into them lightly and ( 1a )( 1b )( 1c ) my not ( 1d )( 1e ).
I climbed the spiral staircase and knocked on the door up at the top. A man came to open it who seemed the image of what a lighthouse-keeper ought to be. He smoked a pipe and had a gray-white beard.
“Come in, come in,” he said, and (2)immediately, with that strange power some people have to put you at ease, he made me feel at home. He seemed to consider it most natural that a boy should come and visit his lighthouse. Of course a boy my age would want to see it, his whole manner seemed to say — there should be more people interested in it, and more visits. He practically made me feel he was there to show the place to strangers, almost as if that lighthouse were a museum or a tower of historical importance.
(3)Well, it was nothing of the sort. There were the boats, and they depended on it. Looking out, we could see the tops of their masts. Outside the harbor was the Bristol Channel, and opposite, barely visible, some thirty miles away, the coast of Somerset.
“And this,” he said, “is a barometer. When the hand goes down, a storm is in the air. Small boats better watch out. Now it points to ‘Variable.’ That means it doesn’t really know what is going to happen — just like us. And that,” he added proudly, like someone who is leaving the ( 4a ) thing for the ( 4b ), “is the lamp.”
I looked up at the enormous lens with its powerful bulb inside.
“And this is how I switch it on, at sunset.” He went to a control box near the wall and put his hand on a lever.
( 5 ), but he did, and the light came on, slowly and powerfully. I could feel its heat above me, like the sun’s. I smiled delightedly, and he looked satisfied. “Beautiful! Lovely!” I cried.
“It stays on for three seconds, then off for two. One, two, three; one, two,” he said, timing it, like a teacher giving a piano lesson, and the light seemed to obey. He certainly knew just how long it stayed lit. “One, two, three,” he said, his hand went down, and the light went off. Then with both hands, like the Creator, he seemed to ask for light, and the light came.
I watched, thrilled.
“Where are you from?” he asked me.
“Italy.”
“Well, all the lights in ( 6a ) parts of the world have a ( 6b ) rhythm. A ship’s captain, seeing this one and timing it, would know which one it was.”
I nodded.
“Now, would you like a cup of tea?” he said. He took out a blue-and-white cup and saucer and poured the tea. Then he gave me a biscuit. “You must come and see the light after dark sometime,” he said.
Late one evening, I went there again. The lamp’s flash lit up a vast stretch of the sea, the boats, the beach, and the dark that followed seemed more than ever dark — so dark that (7)the lamp’s light, powerful as it was, seemed not much stronger than a match’s and almost as short-lived.

 

At the end of the summer, I went home to Italy. For Christmas, I bought a panforte — a sort of fruitcake, the specialty of the town I lived in — and sent it to the lighthouse-keeper. I didn’t think I would see him again, but the very next year I was back in Wales — not on a holiday this time but running away from the war. One morning soon after I arrived, I went to the lighthouse, only to find that the old man had retired.
“He still comes, ( 8 ),” the much younger man who had taken over said. “You’ll find him sitting outside here every afternoon, weather permitting.”
I returned after lunch, and there, sitting on a bench beside the door of the lighthouse, smoking his pipe, was my lighthouse-keeper, with a little dog. (9)He seemed heavier than the year before, not because he had gained weight but because he looked as though he had been put down on the bench and would not easily get off it without help.
“Hello,” I said. “Do you remember me? I came to see you last year.”
“Where are you from?”
“From Italy.”
“Oh, I used to know a boy from Italy. An awfully nice boy. Sent me a fruitcake for Christmas.”
“I was the one who sent it.”
“Yes, he came from Italy — an awfully nice boy.”
(10a)Me, me, that was me,” I insisted.
He looked straight into my eyes for a moment, then away. I felt like a thief, someone who was trying to take somebody else’s place without having a right to it. “Ay, he was an awfully nice boy,” he repeated, as though the visitor he saw now could never match last year’s.
And seeing that he had such a nice memory of me, I didn’t insist further; I didn’t want to spoil the picture. I was at that time of life when suddenly boys turn awkward, lose what can never be regained — a certain early freshness — and enter a new stage in which a hundred things combine to spoil the grace of their performance. I couldn’t see this change, this awkward period in myself, of course, but, standing before him, I felt I never could — never could possibly — be as nice as I had been a year before.
“Ay, he was an awfully nice boy,” the lighthouse-keeper said again, and he looked lost in thought.
(10b)Was he?” I said, as if I were talking of someone whom I didn’t know.

 

【問題】

(1) 空所( 1a )〜( 1e )を埋めるのに最も適切な単語をそれぞれ次のうちから選び、その記号を記せ。

ア about
イ being
ウ welcome
エ without
オ worrying

(2) 下線部(2)を和訳せよ。

(3) 文脈から判断して、下線部(3)はどのようなことを意味していると考えられるか。最も適切なものを次のうちから選び、その記号を記せ。

ア Thanks to the boats, the lighthouse was highly popular with visitors.
イ The significance of the lighthouse was practical rather than historical.
ウ The lighthouse was worthless compared to museums or historical towers.
エ Although boats still depended on it, the lighthouse also functioned as a museum.

(4) 空所( 4a )、( 4b )を埋めるのに最も適当な単語をそれぞれ次のうちから選び、その記号を記せ。

ア best
イ last
ウ least
エ most

(5) 空所( 5 )を埋めるのに最も適切な表現を次のうちから選び、その記号を記せ。

ア I was surprised to see the lever
イ I was sure he’d wait until sunset
ウ I asked him to show me how it worked
エ I didn’t think he’d switch it on just for me

(6) 空所( 6a )、( 6b )には同じ1つの語が入る。その単語を記せ。

(7) 下線部(7)を和訳せよ。

(8) 空所(8)を埋めるのに最も適切な単語を次のうちから選び、その記号を記せ。

ア maybe
イ then
ウ though
エ yet

(9) 下線部(9)から判断して、語り手はどのような印象を受けたと考えられるか。最も適切なものを次のうちから選び、その記号を記せ。

ア He looked old and tired.
イ He looked eager to leave.
ウ He looked as strong as ever.
エ He looked less interesting than before.

(10) 下線部( 10a )と( 10b )の2つの発言の間で、語り手の老人への接し方にはどのような変化が見られるか。40~60字の日本語で答えよ。句読点も字数に含める。

 

【和訳】

その古い灯台は白くて丸く、入り口のドアは小さく、上部には円形の窓があり、巨大な投光器が備え付けられていた。ドアは半開きになっていることが多く、そこから内部の螺旋階段を覗き見ることができた。その魅力に抗しきれず、ある日私は、内部に足を踏み入れた。そしてひとたび中に入ってしまうと、上に登りたい気持ちを抑えることはできなかった。私は13歳の、陽気で黒髪の少年だった。当時の私は、今では入っていけないような場所に入っていくことができた。自分が歓迎されていないのではないか、などと心配することもなく、軽やかに滑り込むことができたのである。
私は螺旋階段を登り、てっぺんのドアをノックした。灯台守のイメージそのままの男がやってきて、ドアを開けてくれた。彼はパイプをふかし、灰白色のヒゲをたくわえていた。
「入りなさい、入りなさい」彼は言った。そして、一部の人の持つ、他人を居心地よくさせる例の不思議な力を彼も持っていたので、私はすぐに落ち着いた気持ちになった。彼は、少年がその灯台に入り、彼の元にやって来ることは、この上なく自然なことだと考えているようだった。私の年頃の少年ならばもちろん灯台を見たいに違いない、彼の所作の全てがそう語っていた。もっと多くの人が興味を持って、もっと多くの人が彼を訪ねて然るべきだったのだ。私には、彼がそこにいるのは、訪問者にその場所を見せてやるためなのだとすら思われた。まるで灯台が、博物館か、あるいは歴史的な価値のある塔であるかのように。
もちろん、その灯台はそのような種類のものではなかった。船が出ており、船には灯台が必要だったのだから。見渡すと、船のマストのてっぺんが見えた。港の外はブリストル海峡であり、反対側には30マイルほど先に、サマーセット海岸がかすかに望まれた。
「そしてこれは」と彼は言った。「気圧計だよ。針が下がっている時は嵐の前触れなんだ。小さな船は気を付ける必要がある。今は『変わりやすい』を指しているね。つまり何が起こるか分からないってことさ。私達と同じさ。そしてあれは」と彼は、最上のものを最後まで残しておいた人のように、誇らしげに付け加えた。「灯火だよ」
私は強力な電球が内部に収められた巨大なレンズを見上げた。
「そしてこうやってスイッチをいれるんだ、日没にね」彼は壁の近くの制御盤に歩み寄り、レバーに手をかけた。
私のためだけに彼がそのスイッチを入れるとは思っていなかったが、彼はそれをした。そして灯火は、ゆっくりと、力強く灯った。私はその熱を、まるで太陽の熱のように、頭上に感じた。私は歓喜の笑みを浮かべ、彼は満足気だった。『綺麗だ、すごいよ』と私は叫んだ。
「3秒間点灯して、それから2秒消えるんだ。1、2、3、1、2」と彼は言い、まるでピアノのレッスンをしている先生のように数を数え、灯火はまるでそれに従っているかのようだった。彼は間違いなく、それがどれだけ点灯しているかを正確に知っていた。「1、2、3」彼は言った。そして彼の手は下がり、灯火は消えた。次に両手で、あたかも創造主のように、彼は光を求めた。すると光が灯った。
私はそれをドキドキしながら見ていた。
「君はどこから来たんだ?」彼は私に尋ねた。
「イタリアです」
「うん、世界中のあらゆる灯火はみんな違ったリズムを持っているんだ。船の船長はそれを見て、数を数えて、それがどこの光かを見分けるんだ」
私は頷いた。
「さてと、お茶でもどうだい?」と彼は言った。彼は青と白のカップ・アンド・ソーサーを取り出してきて、紅茶を注いだ。そして私にクッキーをくれた。「いつかぜひ、暗くなってからの灯火を見に来ておくれ」と彼は言った。
ある夜遅く、私は再び灯台を訪れた。灯火の閃光は、海の茫漠たる彼方と船々と海岸とを照らし出し、それに続く闇はより一層暗いように感じられた。余りにも暗いので、灯台の光は変わらず強力であるにもかかわらず、マッチの炎に比して、大して明るくないばかりか、ほとんど同じくらい短命に思えるのだった。

 

その夏の終わり、私はイタリアに帰った。クリスマスに、私はパンフォルテを買い、あの灯台守に送った。それはフルーツケーキの一種で、私の住む街の名物だった。私は彼にまた会えるとは思っていなかったが、しかしすぐ翌年、私はウェールズに戻ってきた。今回は休暇ではなく、戦争から逃れてきたのだった。到着後のある朝、私は灯台に行ったが、あの老人が退職したと知っただけだった。
「でも彼はまだ来るよ」と、灯台守を引き継いだずっと若い男が言った。「天気さえ良ければ、この外で毎日午後に、彼が座っているのに会えるよ」
私はランチの後戻ってきて、そこで、灯台の入り口の傍にあるベンチに座ってパイプをふかしているのが、小さな犬を連れた私の灯台守だった。彼は前の年よりも重くなったように見えた。それは彼が太ったからではなく、まるで彼がベンチに座らされて、助けなしでは動けないように見えたからだった。
「こんにちは」と私は言った。「僕を覚えていますか?去年あなたに会いに来たんです」
「君はどこから来たんだい?」
「イタリアからです」
「おお、私はイタリアから来たある少年と知り合いだったんだ。素晴らしくいい子でね。クリスマスにフルーツケーキを送ってくれたんだ」
「僕がそれを送った者ですよ」
「そうだ、彼はイタリアから来た少年だった。素晴らしくいい子でね」
「僕、僕、それが僕です」私は主張した。
彼は瞬間、私の目を真っ直ぐに覗き込み、目を逸らした。私はまるで、権利もないのに他の誰かのの地位を奪おうとしている、泥棒になった気がした。「ああ、彼は素晴らしくいい子だった」彼は繰り返した。まるで彼の目の前にいる訪問者は、去年の少年とは比べ物にならないといった風に。
彼が私のことを、それほどまでに良い思い出としてくれていることを知り、私はそれ以上主張しなかった。彼の思い出を壊したくなかったからだ。私は、少年が突然ぎこちなくなり、二度と取り戻せないある種の若々しさを失い、多くのことが重なり合い振る舞いの優美さを損なってしまう新たな段階に入るという、例の人生の節目に当たっていた。私はもちろん、この変化、つまり自身の内にあるこのぎこちない時期について理解できるはずもなかったけれど、彼の前に立っていると、私は決して、どのようなことがあっても決して、一年前のようないい子にはなれないのだと感じた。
「ああ、彼は素晴らしくいい子だった」灯台守はもう一度言い、物思いに沈んだようだった。
「そうだったんですね」と私は言った。まるで私の知らない誰かのことを話しているかのように。

 

【解答】

(1) (a) エ
(b) オ
(c) ア
(d) イ
(e) ウ
(2) 一部の人の持つ、他人を居心地よくさせる例の不思議な力を彼も持っていたので、私はすぐに落ち着いた気持ちになった。
(3)
(4) (a) ア
(b) イ
(5)
(6) different
(7) 灯台の光は変わらず強力であるにもかかわらず、マッチの炎に比して、大して明るくないばかりか、ほとんど同じくらい短命に思えるのだった。
(8)
(9)
(10) 最初は老人の記憶にある少年が自分であることを思い出してもらおうとしていたが、彼の良い思い出を壊さぬよう話を合わせている。
(Visited 1,408 times, 1 visits today)
Share this Post

Leave a Comment

メールアドレスが公開されることはありません。 * が付いている欄は必須項目です

*
*

日本語が含まれない投稿は無視されますのでご注意ください。(スパム対策)