京大過去問 1992年 第1問(英文和訳)

/ 8月 27, 2020/ it-to構文, カンマで分断, 仮定法, 英文和訳, 京大過去問, 難易度★★★★★, リスニング教材紹介/ 0 comments

  • 解答は下部にあります。
  • 下のリンクから問題文をPDFで印刷できます。
  • 間違いの指摘・添削依頼・質問はコメント欄にどうぞ。

【問題】

次の文の下線をほどこした部分(1)~(4)を和訳せよ。

On television, when someone is interviewed on the screen who is a long way away, there is sometimes a blank-faced pause, a beat of two, before he replies to a question. (1)This is the time it takes for the end of the question to rebound from the satellite. It looks odd, because it seems to be a part of our politeness to reply at once; a silence suggests that we think it a silly or rude question.
You learn this time-lag when you try telephoning via satellite. When you speak you hear a faint echo of your last words. The person on the other end has begun to replay, hears your echo and stops, thinking you haven’t finished. But if you allow a beat of two the result is very queer, as well as passionless: ‘The dog died — died,’ one, two, ‘When? — When?’, one, two. The pause makes personal communication almost impossible, although probably it is all right for the transmission of facts. It is as though, in order to make human contact, we verbally have to tread on each other’s heels.
At all events, that seems to be the case in England; not so in Australia. I first noticed this in England, among Australian friends. When I finished speaking they paused, before they replied, as though what I had said was being sifted for rubbish-content. Then I began to suspect they were just not very bright. It was only when I reached Australia that I realized this pause was a national characteristic; that, far from being rude, it was their form of politeness. They wish to make sure that you have entirely finished before they speak. (2)It is as though they had invented a way, perhaps made necessary by the vastnesses of their country, of communicating, as though by satellite, long before the things were ever fired into the sky. It can be worrying, if you are not used to it. For this silence is preceded, it is important to understand, by an apparently blank and earnest attention. There is no recourse to those restless signals of agreement or disagreement; nose-scratchings, ear-rubbings, crossing and uncrossing of knees. They would regard these as attention-seeking, rude, and they are extremely polite people. They sit passive, as though in class, thinking their own thoughts. It is terrifying. (3)I had not realized how much we in Britain take part in a conversation when not speaking. Without that encouragement, unless you are self-obsessed, you begin to hesitate.
Not all Australians employ the satellite-pause, but enough to attract my attention. Perhaps our wildlife has affected us, we are made jumpy by the nervous ways of our sparrows, the speed of our mice; whereas Australians are unconsciously calmed by the slow wing-flap of black swans, made still and patient by wallabies’ sleepy eyes. (4)Nevertheless, I would never have dared to generalize in this way if the whole business of the Australian pause was not ritualised, formalised on Australian radio; with, to the English ear and imagination, disconcerting results. Imagine a pause of two slow beats after a politician has answered a question, before the interviewer asks the next one. Imagine it, and you will soon hear, in nearly audible English, that the interviewer is silently calling him a liar. Imagine a pause of two beats, or more, after a recorded report from some distant trouble-spot. To our imaginations comes a picture of the producer desperately signalling, behind his glass panel, ‘Wrong report!’.
Perhaps they are right. Perhaps we fill the dangerous gap too quickly, hysterically, which is why they suspect us of effeminacy. But relations between the sexes, in Australia, require another chapter.
 

【和訳】

テレビで、遠く離れた人が画面上でインタビューを受けている時、時折うつろな表情の間が生まれ、二拍くらいの後に質問に答える、というようなことがある。(1)これは質問の最後の部分が人工衛星から跳ね返ってくるのに要する時間である。こうしたやりとりが奇妙に感じられるのは、即座に応答することが我々のひとつの礼儀だと思われるからである。黙っていれば、それが愚かな質問あるいは無礼な質問だと、私達が考えているということになってしまう。
人工衛星を介した電話をしてみれば、この時間差を理解できる。話す時、自分の最後の言葉が小さなこだまとなって聞こえる。電話の相手は、応答を始めるもののあなたのこだまを聞いて中断し、あなたの話が終わっていないと考える。しかしあなたが二拍置くと、無気力なだけでなく、非常に奇妙な結果が生じる。「犬が死んだんだ、、死んだんだ」1、2、「いつ?、、いつ?」1、2、といった具合である。この間によって、事実の伝達には問題がないにしても、私的なコミュニケーションはほとんど不可能になる。人間的なコンタクトには、言葉において、他者のすぐ後を辿ることが必要であるかのようである。
いずれにせよ、このことはイギリスにおいては当てはまるように思える。一方で、オーストラリアにおいては当てはまらない。私が初めてこのことに気が付いたのは、イギリスでオーストラリア人の友人達と過ごしていた時だった。私が話し終わると、彼らはまるで私の発言からくだらない内容を取り除くふるいにかけているかのように、応答する前に間を置いた。それで私は彼らが単に頭が鈍いのではないかと疑い始めた。私がオーストラリアに到着して初めて、この間が国民的な特徴だと気が付いた。つまり無礼であるどころか、彼らにとっての礼儀だったのだ。彼らは自分が発言する前に、相手の話が完全に終わったことを確認したいのである。(2)彼らは広大な国土による必要に迫られたのか、人工衛星が空に打ち上げられるずっと前から、まるで人工衛星を介したかのようなコミュニケーションの方法を編み出していたかのようである。このことは慣れていないとやっかいかもしれない。というのも、この点を理解することが大切なのだが、この沈黙の前には一見空虚だが実は真剣な注意が払われるからである。鼻をかいたり、耳をこすったり、脚を組んだり解いたりといった、同意や不同意を表す絶え間ない合図の動作に頼ることはない。オーストラリア人はこうしたことを注意を引き付ける無礼なことだと見なすだろうし、彼らは極めて礼儀正しい人々である。彼らは授業でも受けているかのように、おとなしく座って、自分の考えをめぐらせる。それは恐怖である。(3)我々イギリス人は話していない時であってもいかに多く会話に参加しているのか、ということを私は理解していなかった。そうした励ましがなければ、自分のことしか頭にない人でない限りは、躊躇し始めるものである
オーストラリア人の誰もがこの『人工衛星の間』で話すわけではないが、私の注意を引くには十分な人数である。おそらくイギリスの野生動物に影響され、スズメの神経質な様子やネズミのすばしっこさによって、我々は落ち着きのない性質になっているのだ。一方オーストラリア人は無意識のうちに、黒鳥のゆったりとした羽ばたきに心を静められ、ワラビーの眠たげな目によって穏やかで忍耐強くなっているのである。
(4)そうは言っても、もしもオーストラリアのラジオがこの『オーストラリア的な間』を丸々様式化・定式化し、イギリス人の耳と想像力を狼狽させるような結果をもたらさなかったとしたら、私はこんな風に一般化しようとはしなかっただろう政治家が質問に答えた後、インタビュアーが次の質問に移る前に、ゆっくりとした二拍の間があることを想像してみるとよい。想像してみると、すぐにほとんど聞き取れるような英語で、インタビュアーが密かに彼は嘘つきだと言っているのが聞こえてくる気がするだろう。どこかの遠い紛争地域からの録画されたレポートの後、2拍かそれ以上の間が開くことを想像してみるとよい。ガラスパネルの後ろのプロデューサーが必死に「誤報だ!」と合図を送っている姿が目に浮かんでくる。
おそらくオーストラリア人は正しい。おそらく我々イギリス人はその危険な間を、あまりに性急に、あまりにヒステリックに埋めてしまう。そのためにオーストラリア人は我々を女々しいと感じるのである。しかしオーストラリアにおける性差の問題は、別の章を設ける必要がある。

【難単語・難熟語】

  • tread on each other’s heels すぐ後に付いていく
  • sift ふるいにかける
  • recourse 頼ること
  • jumpy 神経質な、おどおどした
  • wildlife 野生生物
  • disconcert 困惑させる
  • whole business of ~ ~のそっくり全部
  • trouble-spot 紛争地域
  • effeminacy 女性的な、軟弱な

(Visited 1,068 times, 1 visits today)
Share this Post

Leave a Comment

メールアドレスが公開されることはありません。 * が付いている欄は必須項目です

*
*

日本語が含まれない投稿は無視されますのでご注意ください。(スパム対策)