東大過去問 2000年 第5問(総合)

/ 5月 7, 2020/ 東大過去問, 第5問(総合)/ 0 comments

【問題文】

次の英文を読み、以下の設問に答えよ。

I came home from school one day to find a strange man in the kitchen. He was making something on the stove, peering intently into a saucepan.
‘Who are you? What are you doing here?’ I asked him. It was a week since my father died.
The man said, ‘Shh. Not now. Just a minute.’ He had a strong foreign accent.
I recognised that he was concentrating and said, ‘What’s that you’re making?’
This time he glanced at me. ‘Polenta,’ he said.
I went over to the stove and looked inside the saucepan. The stuff was yellowy, sticky, a thick semolina. ‘That looks disgusting,’ I told him, and then went in search of my mother.
I found her in the garden. ‘Mum, there’s a man in the kitchen. He’s cooking. He says he’s making polenta.’
‘Yes, darling? Polenta?’ said my mother. (1)I began to suspect she might not be much help. I wished my father were here. ‘I’m not exactly sure what that is,’ my mother said vaguely.
‘Mum, I don’t care about the polenta. Who is he? What’s he doing in our kitchen?’
‘Ah!’ exclaimed my mother. She was wearing a thin flowery summer dress, and I noticed suddenly how thin she was. My mother, I thought. (2)Everything seemed to pile on top of me and I found myself unexpectedly crying. ‘Don’t cry, love,’ said my mother. ‘It’s all right. He’s our new lodger.’ She hugged me.
I wiped my eyes, sniffing. ‘Lodger?’
‘With your father gone,’ my mother explained, ‘I’m afraid I’m having to ( 3 ) one of the spare rooms.’ She turned and began to walk back towards the house. We could see the lodger in the kitchen, moving about. I put my hand on my mother’s arm to stop her going inside.
‘Is he living here then?’ I asked. ‘With us? I mean, will he eat with us and ( 4 )?’
‘This is his home now,’ said my mother. ‘We must make him feel at home.’ She added, as if it were an afterthought, ‘His name’s Konstantin. He’s Russian.’ Then she went inside.
I paused to take ( 5 ) this information. A Russian. This sounded exotic and interesting and made me inclined to forgive his rudeness. I watched my mother enter the kitchen. Konstantin the Russian looked up and a smile lighted up his face. ‘Maria!’ He opened his arms and she went up to him. They kissed on both cheeks. My mother looked around and beckoned to me.
‘This is my daughter,’ she said. (6)There was a note in her voice that I couldn’t identify. She stretched out her hand to me.
‘Ah! You must be Anna,’ the Russian said.
I was startled, not expecting him to have my name so readily on his lips. I looked at my mother. (7)She was giving nothing away. The Russian held out his hands and said, ‘Konstantin. I am very pleased to meet you. I have heard so much about you.’
We shook hands. I wanted to know how he had heard so much about me, (8)but couldn’t think of a way of asking, at least not with my mother there.
The Russian turned back to his cooking. He seemed familiar with our kitchen. He sprinkled salt and pepper over the top of the mass of semolina-like substance, and then carried it through to the living room. For some reason, my mother and I followed him. We all sat in armchairs and looked at one another. I thought I was the only one who felt any sense of ( 9 ).
When I got home late next evening, Konstantin and my mother were deep in conversation over dinner. There were candles on the table.
‘What’s going on?’ I asked.
‘Are you hungry, darling?’ said my mother. ‘We’ve left you some. It’s in the kitchen.’
I was starving. ‘No thanks,’ I said sullenly, ‘I’m fine.’
Though it was early, I went upstairs to bed.
Later I heard my mother’s footsteps on the stairs. She came into my room and leant over me. I kept my eyes closed and breathed deeply. ‘Anna?’ she said, ‘Anna, are you awake?’
I remained silent.
‘I know you’re awake,’ she said.
There was a pause. (10)I was on the point of giving in when she spoke again. She said, ‘Your father never loved me. You should not have had to know this. He did not love me.’ She spoke each word with a terrible clarity, as if trying to burn it into my brain. I squeezed my eyes tight. Rigid in my bed, I waited for my mother to leave the room, wondering if I would get ( 11 ) all this with time.

 

【問題】

(1) 下線部(1)の説明として最も適当なものはどれか。次のうちから1つ選び、その記号を記せ。

(ア)母親は料理の知識が不足しているという落胆を表している。
(イ)母親は驚いていないのではないかという懸念を表している。
(ウ)母親は自分の質問を理解できないという失望を表している。
(エ)母親だけでは家の管理が出来ないという不安を表している。

(2) 下線部(2)に示される語り手の気持ちの説明として最も適当なものはどれか。次のうちから1つ選び、その記号を記せ。

(ア)I was still in the depths of depression.
(イ)I suddenly realised how defenceless she was.
(ウ)My mother’s arms felt heavy on my shoulders.
(エ)I suddenly felt that things were too much to bear.

(3) 空所(3)に入れるのに最も適当な語はどれか。次のうちから1つ選び、その記号を記せ。

(ア)close
(イ)decorate
(ウ)keep
(エ)let

(4)空所(4)に入れるのに最も適当な語はどれか。次のうちから1つ選び、その記号を記せ。

(ア)anything
(イ)everything
(ウ)nothing
(エ)something

(5) 空所(5)に入れるのに最も適当な語はどれか。次のうちから1つ選び、その記号を記せ。

(ア)down
(イ)in
(ウ)out
(エ)over

(6) 下線部(6)の意味に最も近いものはどれか。次のうちから1つ選び、その記号を記せ。

(ア)I didn’t know why she spoke so softly.
(イ)I couldn’t tell how she had changed her voice.
(ウ)The melody of her voice made it difficult to understand.
(エ)There was something unfamiliar about the way she spoke.

(7) 下線部(7)の意味に最も近いものはどれか。次のうちから1つ選び、その記号を記せ。

(ア)She wasn’t holding out her hands.
(イ)Nothing was missing from the house.
(ウ)I couldn’t tell anything from her face.
(エ)The situation was completely under her control.

(8) 下線部(8)を和訳せよ。

(9) 空所(9)に入れるのに最も適当な語はどれか。次のうちから一つ選び、その記号を記せ。

(ア)direction
(イ)humour
(ウ)purpose
(エ)unease

(10) 下線部(10)の解釈として最もふさわしくないものはどれか。次のうちから1つ選び、その記号を記せ。

(ア)I was about to cry.
(イ)I was about to speak to her.
(ウ)I was about to open my eyes.
(エ)I was about to admit that I was awake.

(11) 空所(11)に入れるのに最も適当な語はどれか。次のうちから1つ選び、その記号を記せ。

(ア)at
(イ)in
(ウ)on
(エ)over

 

【和訳】

ある日私が家から帰ると、見知らぬ男の人がキッチンにいた。その男の人はコンロで何かを作っていて、鍋をじっと見つめていた。
「あなたは誰?そこで何をしているの?」私は彼に言った。父が死んでまだ一週間だった。
その男の人は言った。「しーっ、今はダメだ。ちょっと待ってくれ。」彼には強い外国訛りがあった。
私は彼が集中している事を知って、「何を作っているの?」と聞いた。
今度は彼は私を見た。「ポレンタ」と彼は言った。
私はコンロの方に行って鍋を覗き込んだ。それは黄色がかった、ねばねばした、セモリナだった。「気持ち悪いわ。」私は彼にそう言って、母を探しに行った。
母は庭にいた。「ママ、男の人がキッチンで料理してる。ポレンタ作ってるって言ってる。」
「ああ、おかえり。ポレンタ?」と母は言った。(1)母は役にたちそうにないと私は思った。お父さんがここにいてくれたら。「ポレンタって何なのか、私よく知らないの。」母はポツンと言った。
「お母さん、ポレンタはどうでもいいの。あの人は誰?うちのキッチンであの人は何してるの?」
「ああ!」母は叫んだ。彼女は薄手の花柄のサマードレスを着ていた。その時私は母がどれだけ痩せているか気が付いた。お母さん、、と私は思った。(2)が私にのしかかってくるように感じて、私は気がつけば泣き出していた。「泣かないで。大丈夫よ。彼は新しい下宿人なの。」そう言って母は私を抱きしめた。
私はすすり上げながら、目を拭った。「下宿人?」
「お父さんが死んでしまったから、空いた部屋を貸す必要があると思うの。」と母は説明した。母は振り返って、家の方に歩き始めた。歩き回る下宿人がキッチンにいるのが見えた。私は母の腕を取り、家の中に戻るのを引き止めた。
「じゃあ、あの人はここで暮らすってこと?」と私は尋ねた。「私達と?つまり、あの人は私達とご飯食べたり、何もかも一緒にするの?」
「もう彼にとってここは家なの。彼がくつろげるようにしないとね。」そして母は今思い出したかのように付け加えた。「彼の名前はコンスタンチンっていうの。ロシア人よ。」そして母は中に入って行った。
私はこの情報を飲み込むのに少し時間がかかった。ロシア人。ロシア人という響きはエキゾチックで、彼の非礼も許す気になった。私は母がキッチンに入るのを見た。ロシア人のコンスタンチンは母を見て、笑顔を浮かべた。「マリア!」彼は腕を広げ、母は彼の方へ行った。2人は頬にキスし合った。母は振り向いて、私を手招きした。
「私の娘よ。」母は言った。(6)の声に私には耳慣れない響きがあった。母は私に手を伸ばした。
「じゃあ、君がアンナか。」ロシア人は言った。
彼の口からそんなにすぐ私の名前が出てくるとは思ってなかったので、私は驚いた。私は母を見た。(7)母の表情は何も明かしはしなかった。ロシア人は握手を求めて言った。「コンスタンチンだ。会えて嬉しいよ。君については色々聞いていたんだ。」
私達は握手をした。どんな風に私の事を色々と聞いていたのか知りたかった(8)が、どう尋ねていいのか分からなかった。少なくともそこに母がいては聞けなかった。
そのロシア人は振り返って料理に戻った。彼はうちのキッチンに馴染んでいるように見えた。彼はセモリナのような何かに塩胡椒を振って、リビングへとそれを運んだ。なぜだか、母と私は彼について行った。私達はみんな肘掛け椅子に座って、顔を見合わせた。不安をわずかでも感じているのは私だけなのだと、私は思った。
次の夜、私が遅く帰ると、コンスタンチンと母は、夕食を食べながら、会話を弾ませていた。テーブルにはキャンドルが飾られていた。
「何事よ?」私は尋ねた。
「お腹空いたでしょ?」と母は言った。「あなたの分も残してるのよ。キッチンにあるわ。」
私は腹ぺこだった。「いらない。けっこうよ。」
私はむっつりと言った。まだ早かったが、私は二階へ上がってベッドに入った。
しばらくして、母が階段を上がって来るのが聞こえた。私は目を閉じ、深く息をした。「アンナ?アンナ、起きてる?」母は言った。
私は黙っていた。
「起きているの知ってるのよ。」と母は言った。
沈黙が流れた。母がまた話し始めたのは、(10)私はまさに降参しようとしていた時だった。「お父さんは私を愛してくれなかったの。あなたにはそれを知られるべきじゃないと思っていたのだけど。彼は私を愛してなかったの。」母は一語一語恐ろしくはっきりと言った。私の頭にそれを焼き付けようとするかのように。私は目をぎゅっと閉じた。ベッドの中で硬くなって、母が部屋を出ていってくれるのを待った。私はこれら全ての事をいつか乗り越えられるのだろうかと、考えながら。

 

【解答】

(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)
(8) しかし、どう尋ねていいのか分からなかった。少なくともそこに母がいては聞けなかった。
(9)
(10)
(11)
(Visited 1,116 times, 3 visits today)
Share this Post

Leave a Comment

メールアドレスが公開されることはありません。 * が付いている欄は必須項目です

*
*

日本語が含まれない投稿は無視されますのでご注意ください。(スパム対策)