東大過去問 2022年 第1問B(長文空欄補充)

/ 10月 26, 2022/ 東大過去問, 難易度★★★/ 0 comments

【問題】

以下の英文を読み、(ア)、(イ)の問いに答えよ。

One evening Adam Mastroianni was reluctantly putting on his bow tie for yet another formal party at the University of Oxford that he had no interest in attending. Inevitably, Mastroianni, then a master’s student in psychology at the university, knew that he would be stuck in some endless conversation that he did not want, with no way to politely excuse himself. Even worse, he suddenly realized, he might unknowingly be the one to set up unwanted conversation traps for others. “What if both people are thinking exactly the same thing, but we’re both stuck because we can’t move on when we’re really done?” he wondered.
Mastroianni’s idea may have been on the mark. A recent study reports on what researchers discovered when they climbed into the heads of speakers to gauge their feelings about how long a particular conversation should last. ( 1 ) In fact, people are very poor judges of when their partner wishes to stop it. In some cases, however, people were dissatisfied not because the conversation went on for too long but because it was too short.
”Whatever you think the other person wants, you may well be wrong,” says Mastroianni, who is now a psychology research student at Harvard University. “So you might as well leave at the first time it seems appropriate because it’s better to be left wanting more than less.”
Most past research about conversations has been conducted by linguists or sociologists. Psychologists who have studied conversations, on the other hand, have mostly used their research as a means of investigating other things, such as how people use words to persuade. A few studies have explored what phrases individuals say at the ends of conversations, but the focus has not been on when people choose to say them. “Psychology is just now waking up to the fact that this is a really interesting and fundamental social behavior,” Mastroianni says.
He and his colleagues undertook two experiments to examine the dynamics of conversation. In the first, they quizzed 806 online participants about the duration of their most recent conversation. ( 2 ) The individuals involved reported whether there was a point in the conversation at which they wanted it to end and estimated when that was in relation to when the conversation actually ended.
In the second experiment, held in the lab, the researchers split 252 participants into pairs of strangers and instructed them to talk about whatever they liked for anywhere from one to 45 minutes. Afterward the team asked the subjects ( イ )and to guess about their partner’s answer to the same question.
Mastroianni and his colleagues found that only two percent of conversations ended at the time both parties desired, and only 30 percent of them finished when one of the pair wanted them to. In about half of the conversations, both people wanted to talk less, but the points they wanted it to end were usually different. ( 3 ) To the researchers’ surprise, they also found that it was not always the case that people wanted talk less; in 10 percent of conversations, both study participants wished their exchange had lasted longer. And in about 31 percent of the interactions between strangers, at least one of the two wanted to continue.
Most people also failed at guessing their partner’s desires correctly. When participants guessed at when their partner had wanted to stop talking, they were off by about 64 percent of the total conversation length.
That people fail so completely in judging when a conversation partner wishes to end the conversation “is an astonishing and important finding,” says Thalia Wheatley, a social psychologist at Dartmouth College, who was not involved in the research. Conversations are otherwise “such an elegant expression of mutual coordination,” she says. “And yet it all falls apart at the end because we just can’t figure out when to stop.” This puzzle is probably one reason why people like to have talks over coffee, drinks or a meal, Wheatley adds, because “the empty cup or plate gives us a way out — a critical conversation-ending cue.”
Nicholas Epley, a behavioral scientist at the University of Chicago, who was not on the research team, wonders what would happen if most conversations ended exactly when we wanted them to. “( 4 )” he asks.
While this cannot be determined in the countless exchanges of everyday life, scientists can design an experiment in which conversations either end at precisely the point when a participant first wants to stop or continue for some point beyond. “Do those whose conversations end just when they want them to actually end up with better conversations than those that last longer?” Epley asks. “I don’t know, but I’d love to see the results of that experiment.”
The findings also open up many other questions. Are the rules of conversation clearer in other cultures? Which cues, if any, do expert conversationalists pick up on? ( 5 )
”The new science of conversation needs rigorous descriptive studies like this one, but we also need casual experiments to test strategies that might help us navigate the important and pervasive challenges of conversation,” says Alison Wood Brooks, a professor of business administration at Harvard Business School, who was not involved in the study. “I think it’s pretty wild, and yet we’re just beginning to rigorously understand how people talk to each other.”
(注) linguist 言語学者

【問題】

(ア)空所(1)~(5)をに入れるのに最も適切な文を以下のa)~f)より一つずつ選べ。ただし、同じ記号を複数回用いてはならない。
a) How is it possible for anybody to correctly guess when their partner wants to start the conversation?
b) How many new insights, novel perspectives or interesting facts of life have we missed because we avoided a longer or deeper conversation that we might have had with another person?
c) Most of them had taken place with a family member or friends.
d) Participants in both studies reported, on average, that the desired length of their conversation was about half of its actual length.
e) The team found that conversations almost never end when both parties want them to.
f) What about the dynamics of group chats?

(イ)下に与えられた語を正しい順に並び替え、空所(イ)を埋めるのに最も適切な表現を完成させよ。
been conversation have have liked over the they to when would

【和訳】

ある晩アダム・マストロヤンニは、オックスフォード大学でまたしても開催される、気乗りのしない堅苦しいパーティーのために、渋々蝶ネクタイを付けていた。当時、同大学の心理学の修士学生だったマストロヤンニは、不本意な終わりのない会話に囚われて、丁重に中座することも叶わないだろうと、当然のこととして分かっていた。さらに悪いことに、彼は唐突に気が付いてしまったのだ。彼自身知らぬ間に、他人を不本意な会話の罠に捕らえる側に回っているかもしれないということに。『両者が全く同じことを考えているにも関わらず、やりとりが終わったその時に動き出せないせいで、お互いに抜け出せずにいるのではないか』と彼は考えた。
マストロヤンニの考えは正しかったのかもしれない。最近の研究において、特定の会話がどれだけ続くべきかについての話者の感情を調査するために、研究者達は話者の頭の中まで検討し、その際発見したことを報告している。(1)研究者チームは、会話が両者の望み通りのタイミングで終わることは、ほとんどないことを発見した。実際人々は、相手がいつ会話を終えたいかを判断するのが、極めて不得手である。しかし一部のケースでは、会話が長すぎることによってではなく、短すぎることによって、人々が不満を抱くこともあった。
『他人が望むことについて想像してみたところで、それはおそらく間違っています』と、今はハーバード大学の心理学の研究生であるマストロヤンニは言う。『だから相応しいと思った最初のタイミングで立ち去って構わないんです。もう沢山と思われるよりは、もっと話したい所でやめておいた方がいいからです。』
会話に関する過去の研究のほとんどは、言語学者か社会学者によって行われてきた。一方で、会話を研究する心理学者は主に、人々が他人を説得するためにどのように言葉を使うかといった、会話を終えるタイミングとは別のことを調査する手段として、自身の研究を活用してきた。個々の人が会話の終わりにどのようなフレーズを使うのかを検証した研究は少しはあるが、その焦点は、人々がいつそれを言うかではなかった。『心理学は今まさに、これが真に興味深く、かつ基本的な社会行動だと気付き始めているんです』とマストロヤンニは言う。
彼と彼の共同研究者達は、会話の力学を調査するため、2つの実験に着手した。手始めに、彼らは806人のオンラインの参加者に、最近の会話の継続時間を尋ねた。(2)その会話の大半は、家族か友人となされたものだった。参加者は会話を打ち切りたい時点があったかどうかを報告し、それが実際に会話が終了した時点と比較していつだったのかを推定した。
研究室で行われた2番目の実験では、252人の参加者達は初対面同士のペアに分けられ、1分から45分の間で好きなだけ、内容を問わず会話をするよう指示された。その後、研究チームは彼らに、(イ)いつその会話が終わって欲しかったかを尋ね、さらに話し相手が同じ質問にどう答えたかを推測するよう求めた。
マストロヤンニと彼の共同研究者達は、会話が双方の望むタイミングで終わったのはたった2パーセントであり、一方が望むタイミングで終わったのは30パーセントしかなかったことを発見した。会話のおよそ半数において、双方がもっと短い方がよいと感じていたが、会話を終えたいと感じるタイミングは異なっていることが多かった。(3)2つの実験のどちらの参加者も、平均すると、会話の望ましい長さは実際のおよそ半分だったと報告した。研究者達は、人々が常に会話を打ち切りたいと思っているわけではないということも発見し、驚いた。会話の10%においては、被験者の双方が、やりとりがもっと長く続くことを望んでいた。見知らぬもの同士のやりとりのおよそ31%において、少なくともその一方は、会話の継続を望んでいた。
またほとんどの人は、話相手の希望を正確に推測することができなかった。相手が話をやめたいタイミングを参加者に推測させた所、会話全体の長さに対して、およそ64%ずれていた。
話し相手が会話を終わらせたいと望むタイミングを判断することが、これほどまでに困難であるという事実は『驚くべき、かつ重要な発見です』とダートマス大学の社会心理学者であり、同調査には関わっていなかったタリア・ウィートリーは言う。終わり方という点を除けば、会話は『相互の共同関係の極めてエレガントな表れである』と彼女は言う。『にもかかわらず、終わらせるタイミングがどうにも分からないというだけで、会話は最後の最後になって瓦解してしまうんです』。人々がコーヒーやお酒を飲んだり、食事をしながら話をすることを好むのは、もしかしたらこの難問が一因かもしれないと、ウィートリーは言い添える。なぜなら『空になったコップや皿が私たちに出口、つまり会話を終える決定的なきっかけを与えてくれますから』。
シカゴ大学の行動科学者であり、今回の調査チームには参加していなかったニコラス・エプレイは、もしもほとんどの会話がぴったり希望通りのタイミングで終わるとしたらどうなるだろう、との疑問を抱く。(4)『我々は、話し相手と交わすはずだった、より長くより深い会話を避けたことによって、人生における新しい見識・斬新な観点・興味深い事実を、いったいどれほど失ってきたのでしょうか』と彼は問う。
日常生活の無数のやり取りの中でこれを判断することはできないが、参加者の一方が最初に望んだ時点でぴったり終了する会話、あるいはそれよりも長く続く会話をさせるような実験を、学者が企画することはできる。『望み通りのタイミングで会話を終える人は、本当に、長く続く会話よりも良い会話ができていると言えるのでしょうか』エプレイは問う。『それは分からないですが、そのような実験の結果を是非知りたいものです』
発見は他の多くの疑問にもつながる。会話のルールは、他の文化ではもっと明確なのだろうか。会話に合図があるとしたら、話の上手な人はそのうちのどれに気が付くのだろうか。(5)集団でのおしゃべりの力学はどうなっているのだろうか。
『会話に関する新しい科学は、この研究と同様の厳密な記述的研究を必要としますが、会話における重要かつ恒常的な難問を切り抜ける助けとなるような戦略をテストするために、敷居の低い実験も必要です』とハーバード・ビジネス・スクールの経営学教授で、この研究に参加していなかったアリソン・ウッドは言う。『それはかなり厄介なものになるでしょうが、我々は人々がいかに会話を交わすのかについて、厳密な理解を始めたばかりなのです』

【解答】

(ア)(1) e)
(2) c)
(3) d)
(4) b)
(5) f)

(イ)when they would have liked the conversation to have been over

【単語】

  • reluctantly → 嫌々、しぶしぶ
  • put on → 着る、身に付ける
  • bow tie →蝶ネクタイ
  • yet another → さらにもう一つの
  • have no intesest in doing → 〜したくない
  • inevitably → 必然的に、予想通り。ここではknewにかかっている。
  • master’s student → 修士課程の学生、大学院生
  • then → 当時
  • psychology → 心理学
  • be stuck in → はまり込んで抜け出せない、立ち往生する
  • with no way to → 〜することはできない
  • excuse oneself → 中座する、退席する
  • even → 比較級の強調
  • unknowingly → 知らぬ間に
  • what if~? → もし〜だったらどうだろう?、もし〜したらどうなるだろう?
  • move on → 話題を変える、(話を)先に進める
  • be done → 終えている、ここでは会話を終えていることを表す
  • on the mark → 正確な
  • climb into → 苦労して移動する、ここでは話者の頭の中を苦労して調査し探ったことを表す
  • gauge → 計測する、判断する
  • may well → おそらく〜だろう、〜するのももっともだ
  • might as well do → 〜してもかまわない、〜した方がましだ
  • appropriate → 適切な
  • leave wanting more → wanting moreはここでは『(相手が)もっと話をしたいと思うこと』。wantingは形容詞で『足りない』という意味があるが、形容詞扱いであればmoreがwantingの前につくはずなので、分詞と捉える。leaveは『〜のままにして会話を終える』という意味。
  • than less → than wanting lessの意味。話をしたいと思うことが少ないこと。つまりもう話したくないと思うこと。
  • conduct → 行う
  • linguist → 言語学者
  • sociologist → 社会学者
  • means → 手段
  • investigate → 調査する
  • other things → 『他のこと』とは『会話を終えるタイミングとは別のこと』。この文章は一貫して、会話を終える話であることに注意。
  • persuade → 説得する
  • explore → 調査する、探求する
  • phrase → フレーズ、表現、言い回し
  • individuals → 個々の人。人々と訳しても構わないが、筆者があえてpeopleと使い分けていることに注意。過去の研究が、会話の終わりについて一般化できるほど徹底的なものでなかったことを示唆している。
  • wake up to the fact that~ → 〜という事実に気が付く
  • fundamental → 基本的な、根本的な、重要な
  • colleague → 同僚、ここでは共同研究者
  • undertake → 始める、着手する
  • examine → 調査する
  • dynamics → 相互の力関係、力学、変化をもたらす原動力
  • quiz → 質問する
  • participant → 参加者
  • duration → 継続時間
  • take place → 発生する、行われる
  • involved → 参加した、関わった。直前のindividualsにかかっている。
  • estimate → 推定する
  • in relation to A → Aに対して、Aと比べて
  • estimated when that was in relation to when the conversation actually ended → 例えば、実際の会話が1時間で、終わりたいと感じたのが30分時点であれば、会話時間の半分の時点で、少なくとも一方は会話を打ち切りたかったということ。
  • lab → (=laboratory)実験室、研究室
  • split → 分割する
  • afterward → (afterwards)その後
  • subject → 被験者
  • would like A to do → Aにdoすることを望む
  • be over → 終える、終わる
  • both party → 双方、両者
  • to the researchers’ surprise → 研究者の驚いたことには
  • both study participants → bothはparticipantsにかかっている。studyは単数形なので、こちらにかかることはできない。会話をしている双方・両者という意味。
  • it is not always the case that~ → 〜は必ずしも真実でない
  • exchange → やりとり、議論
  • interaction → 交流
  • be off → 離れている、ずれている
  • by → (差を表して)〜だけ、〜の差で
  • social psychologist → 社会心理学者、(社会心理学:他者の存在が人に与える影響について研究する学問)
  • Dartmouth College → ダートマス大学(アメリカ、ニューハンプシャー州の大学)
  • otherwise → その他の点では、ここでは『会話の終わりを双方がうまく判断できないという以外は』という意味。
  • elegant → 洗練された、上質な
  • mutual coordination → 相互の共同作用
  • and yet → それなのに、それにもかかわらず
  • fall apart → バラバラになる、崩壊する
  • just can’t~ → どうしても〜できない、なかなか〜できない
  • figure out → 答えを出す、解決する
  • puzzle → 難問、謎
  • talk over coffee → コーヒー越しに会話する→コーヒーを飲みながら話す
  • coffee, drinks or a meal → drinksは酒のこと。coffeeとdrinksとmealが並列されている。
  • a way out → 出口、逃げ道
  • a way out — a critical conversation-ending cue → a way outとa critical conversation-ending cueは同格の言い換え。
  • critical → 決定的な、重大な
  • cue → きっかけ、合図、ここでは会話の終わりなどの合図
  • behavioral science → 行動科学
  • insight → 見識、洞察
  • novel → 斬新な
  • perspective → 視点、観点、ものの見方
  • might have had → 事実に反することを述べる仮定法過去完了。実際には会話を切り上げたために、得られなかった知見があるということ。
  • determine → 特定する、確定する
  • countless → 無数の、数えきれないほどの
  • precisely → 正確に、きちんと
  • those whose conversations end just when they want them to → thoseはconversationsを表す。whose conversations end just when they want them toはthoseにかかる関係節。toの後ろにはendが省略されている。
  • end up with~ → 結果として〜を手に入れる、最終的に〜になる
  • I’d love to → = I would like to
  • the findings → この文章で述べられているマストロヤンニの実験の成果を指している。直前に仮定されている『参加者の一方が最初に望んだ時点でぴったり終了する会話、あるいはそれよりも長く続く会話をさせるような実験』の成果ではないので注意。
  • if any → もしあるとすれば
  • conversationalist → 話の上手な人
  • pick up on A → Aに気が付く
  • rigorous → 厳密な、厳重な
  • descriptive → 記述的な、ここではデータをしっかりと分析すること(descriptive statistics)を表している?
  • casual → 略式の、無頓着の、ここではdescriptiveに対して、それほど厳密でない実験について述べている
  • strategy → 戦略
  • navigate → うまく切り抜ける
  • pervasive → 隅々まで広がっている、普及している
  • challenge → 難問、課題
  • business administration → 経営学
 

【読解・解答のポイント】

  • まずは全文をしっかりと和訳できることが大前提。「ざっくりと文意をつかめばよい」というような読み方は、東大受験では通用しない。テスト本番で分からない部分を想像で補うのは仕方ないにしても、基本的に全ての文を正確に(かつ速く)読む必要がある。
  • 2022年の第1問Bは『会話の終わり』に関する研究についての文章だが、『研究者(マストロヤンニ)のエピソード(動機)』『この研究の位置付け』『実際の実験とその結果』『この研究に対する他の学者の評価』『今後の展望』といったものが次々と述べられるので、全体の構成を掴みにくい。まずは『会話の終わりについての研究とその結果』についてしっかり把握することが大切になる。
ア (1)-e 難易度★★★ The team found that conversations almost never end when both parties want them to.

研究者チームは、会話が両者の望み通りのタイミングで終わることは、ほとんどないことを発見した。




ア (1)-e 難易度★★★ The team found that conversations almost never end when both parties want them to.

研究者チームは、会話が両者の望み通りのタイミングで終わることは、ほとんどないことを発見した。




ア (1)-e 難易度★★★ The team found that conversations almost never end when both parties want them to.

研究者チームは、会話が両者の望み通りのタイミングで終わることは、ほとんどないことを発見した。




ア (1)-e 難易度★★★ The team found that conversations almost never end when both parties want them to.

研究者チームは、会話が両者の望み通りのタイミングで終わることは、ほとんどないことを発見した。




ア (1)-e 難易度★★★ The team found that conversations almost never end when both parties want them to.

研究者チームは、会話が両者の望み通りのタイミングで終わることは、ほとんどないことを発見した。




(Visited 82 times, 1 visits today)
Share this Post

Leave a Comment

メールアドレスが公開されることはありません。 * が付いている欄は必須項目です

*
*

日本語が含まれない投稿は無視されますのでご注意ください。(スパム対策)